Business Travel Solutions

Villa Adriana was referred to as an ‘ideal city’ due to the meticulous planning that went into its construction. The Mediterranean world was brought to the fore culturally through the Renaissance and Baroque architectural marvels that are found within Villa Adriana's confines.

Explore Italian History, Art And Culture At Villa Adriana

Villa Adriana, located in Tivoli near Rome, is a classical ensemble that best displays the works of the 2nd century AD Roman Emperor, Hadrian. The ensemble is a harmonious blend of Roman, Egyptian, and Greek architecture. Villa Adriana was referred to as an ‘ideal city’ due to the meticulous planning that went into its construction. The Mediterranean world was brought to the fore culturally through the Renaissance and Baroque architectural marvels that are found within Villa Adriana's confines.

The villa occupies an area of 120 hectares along the slopes of Tiburtine Hills. The area on which the present day villa lies was first occupied by the Late Republican Villa, a Property of Vibia Sabina, Hadrian’s Wife.

History

AD 118 to 138 – The imperial residence was built over the Republican Villa as a symbol of absolute power.

138 AD – Hadrian died. His successors preferred Rome to Villa Adriana as permanent residence, but it continued to be enlarged and embellished.

When the Roman Empire fell, Constantine the Great of the Byzantine Empire is said to have carried off the better pieces of the villa. As the villa fell into neglect, the barbarian invaders plundered the villa. It would fall to the level of being used as a quarry by builders and lime burners.

15th century – Pope Pius II rekindled interest in the ruins

16th century – Emperor Alexander VI ordered excavations and as Cardinal Ippolito II d'Este began to constructing Villa d'Este nearby, he ordered excavation \under the supervision of his architect. He intended to use the works of art obtained from here to be used to adorn Villa d’Este.

Attractions

Attractions in the Villa are divided into 4 categories as follows:

  1. Category I – This consists of the Greek Theatre and the Temple of Aphrodite Cnidi
  2. Category II - This consists of Maritime Theatre, Court of the Libraries, Latin and Greek Libraries, Imperial Palace and Golden Square, is the core of the complex, aligned with the Vale of Tempe.
  3. Category III – This consists of the Pecile, Stadium and its associated buildings, Small and Large Thermae, Canopus, Serapeum and Cento Camerelle
  4. Category IV – this category comprises of Lily Pond, Roccabruna Tower and Academy.

The attractions in Villa Adriana cannot fit into a simple blog posts. Rather, than reading about the destination, you are well advised to visit it.

Tags:

I want to go to Italy

calendar